Spain for keeps?

Sun, blue skies and nature’s bounty!

So now,  off to settle in Spain, having concluded our eight months on Safari in southern Africa.  Ha ha…when is 8 months ever enough?!  Although we marvelled again at the vastness of Africa, breathed deeply as the evening air cooled and the sun sank in a golden shimmer below the western horizon, tensed with excitement as big cats stalked past – all the while relishing our good fortune – we started looking north again… contemplating a new, stranger, Spanish life.

Having made our decision based largely on the abundance of sunshine and space, it was mildly disappointing (and ironic, too) to land at Malaga in the rain.  Officially Malaga’s Costa del Sol Airport!  No hay problema!  A minor blip, no doubt, as the dependable Spanish summer awaited us…

Choosing a beautiful B&B an hour away from Malaga, in the hills near Alfarnatejo, as our first stop seemed like a great idea and was easily arranged on a laptop in another country, but actually finding it required a little more application… and some scary new driving experiences.  Navigating narrow mountain roads, while driving on the ‘wrong’ side of the road was hair-raising!  It was worth it, though…  Margarete’s house was gorgeous: mountain views, a gorgeous pool, a backdrop of rocky crags, the gentle tinkling of goat bells – and a hostess who has now become a friend.  A local venta (inn/pub) down the road and a little pueblo blanco (white village) up the road.  What with a local Gazpacho Fiesta, this life could get some serious hooks in! (Gazpacho: wholseome, fresh tomato soup).

Sun, pool and vista in Alfarnate, Malaga.

We met Enrique one night, down at the inn.  Bubbly, cheeky little terrier, but exceptionally hospitable.  As is Maria, his very able wife who makes delicious tapas and supplied us with an endless stream.  We weren’t always sure what we were ordering, but we never went hungry; we’ve loved discovering new food, and new ways of cooking old favourites.  Amazing how Enrique’s liqueurs improve Richard’s Spanish… so he claims, anyway.  We still go back to visit and laugh and get teased in Spanish!

Our next house was arranged for us by Angela, a lovely English woman with close to 20 years’ experience of living in Spain.  Our landlord is Miguel: a very hospitable, friendly Spaniard with a lovely young family and a wonderful sense of tradition and living off the land.  He has rare-breed Andalucian chickens, and plentiful fresh fruit and vegetables in his garden; a highlight was watching Miguel and his family crushing grapes to make wine in the traditional way.  We would stumble through conversations about local ferias (festivals), food, harvests, villages and his wine-making!  Miguel’s casa has been a tranquil home-base for our introductory few months in Spain.  Actually a traditional finca (small rustic country cottage), now modernised into a holiday cottage with a large outdoor living area and little pool for the blistering hot days in July and August.

Miguel’s family restaurant is down the road… serving good local food and ice cold beer and wine under the shade of a grapevine.  It’s a regular haunt for the old men and their competitive dominos: raucous domino rounds resound – possibly only equalled by the passion and intensity of the Spanish conversations.

mango

Aaah, the colour, aroma and flavour of fresh fruit straight off the tree!

 

8ª Fiesta de la Cabra Malagueña en Casabermeja. Local food produce in honourof the local goats!

8ª Fiesta de la Cabra Malagueña en Casabermeja. Local food produce in honour of the local goats!

Within weeks of our arrival we sat engaged in a confusing yet fascinating enterprise as we familiarised ourselves with Spanish bureaucracy.  Not a lot different to bureaucracy anywhere else; more of a Spanish flavour and clearly more stressful in a foreign language, but still the same nitpicking and prevarication that characterises dealing with officialdom in so many countries!  (In Spanish we think that would be “quisquilloso y prevaricacion” – but testing that out will have to wait for a bit more boldness on our part!)

As the summer temperatures rose we settled more into a Spanish rhythm: breakfast at about 10:00am, lunch at 2:00pm, a siesta to escape the intense heat of the day (with temperatures regularly reaching 40 degrees) and a late supper…  We’re seldom in bed before midnight.

House-hunting is our priority, so that’s been our main focus since early July… touring the countryside and exploring little villages.  Apart from knowing we wanted to be in Malaga province, in inland Andalucia, we didn’t have any fixed idea about location – which has made house-hunting both interesting and challenging!  We have our sights set on a particular type of house (which we have yet to find!) but we have seen some really beautiful places and, of course, some less than comfortable spots.  As you might imagine, matching what we read on paper to reality is sometimes virtually impossible.

Even out house-hunting, stopping at little country ventas and local cafes, the Spanish rhythm prevails (apart from the siesta, that is!)  We have found ourselves a wonderful estate agent.  Simone is a professional, honest, down-to-earth, straight talking, no nonsense Dutch lady who has settled in Spain.  Her local knowledge, sense of humour and facial expressions when she doesn’t like what she sees, have kept us entertained during many a long day visiting properties in the heat.  It helps, too, that she knows the best restaurants and where to find a superb sizzling Gambas Pil-pil (Spicy Prawns)!

Image courtesy of http://www.absoluteaxarquia.com

Image courtesy of http://www.absoluteaxarquia.com

We thoroughly enjoyed having friends visit during the summer – especially as it gave us an excuse to be tourists again…  Discovering the province of Malaga has been fascinating!  We’ve explored from the relatively quiet, protected beaches in a natural park north of Nerja, inland to Antequera and the fascinating karst rock formations of El Torcal, north to the sunflower fields of Cordoba, through Campillos by the flamingo lakes at Fuenta de Piedra, past Ardales and El Chorro to the embalses (or ‘Malaga Lakes’) and the amazing Caminito del Rey walk, across mountains to the historic town of Ronda, over the beautiful Sierra de las Nieves, and down to the busy and vibrant coastal strip of Marbella.  A huge arc encompassing a large chunk of Andalucia pivoting around Malaga and encircled by beautiful rocky sierras.

The sun-drenched plains south of Cordoba.

The sun-drenched plains south of Cordoba.

 

Olive groves, river valleys and sierras!

Olive groves, river valleys and sierras! Axarquia, Malaga.

 

Food of the Gods, or Godesses! Nature's bounty for eating as opposed to fermenting :-)

Food of the Gods, or Godesses! Nature’s bounty for eating as opposed to fermenting :-)

 

ronda

Ronda and the fascinating Punte Nuevo. New Bridge.

Two particularly picturesque areas we’ve most enjoyed have been El Torcal and the Caminito del Rey.  El Torcal is an endlessly fascinating mountainous landscape filled with an assortment of different limestone rock formations, constantly eroded by wind and rain…  If you arrive early and explore before the tourist hordes arrive, you may be privileged to see wild Spanish Ibex on the rocky cliffs – traversing seemingly impossible cliff faces!  Griffon vultures wait for the thermals and then soar overhead – often in groups of 20 or more.  Every turn in the path opens up new far-reaching vistas and the possibility of spotting more Ibex.  Just magnificent!

The captivating and riveting Karst landscape of El Torcal near Antequera!

The captivating and riveting Karst landscape of El Torcal near Antequera!

 

The curious inhabitants of El Torcal. Cabras Montes or Spanish Ibex.

The curious inhabitants of El Torcal. Cabras Montes or Spanish Ibex.

Equally magnificent is the Caminito del Ray walk, once known as the ‘most dangerous walk in Europe’, which links two of the Guadalhorce embalses (reservoirs).  You walk through a gorge along a vertiginous footpath attached to sheer rocky cliffs 100 metres or so above the ground. It’s awe-inspiring, breathtaking and occasionally dizzingly scary!  The juxtaposition of the ancient cliffs; the original old path (now worn and full of holes); the newly restored path that often straddles the old path; the train line with modern high speed trains that intermittently pass through tunnels in the mountains; the eagles and vultures that soar majestically overhead; and the constant stream of excited walkers is absolutely captivating.

The awesome Caminito del Rey. A river gorge walk suspended above canyons and bolted to cliff faces.!

The awesome Caminito del Rey. A river gorge walk suspended above canyons and bolted to cliff faces!

 

El Caminito del Rey

El Caminito del Rey – also visible by train!!

 

The new, safer, walkway above the old on El Caminito del Rey!

The new, safer, walkway above the old on El Caminito del Rey!

The hillsides are a patchwork of olive and almond trees, interspersed with splashes of colour from the oleander, the colourful garden flowers and the pretty bee-eaters migrating south.  The harvesting of almonds is happening now and the gentle thwacking of the branches to dislodge the nuts into nets below drifts to us through the cooler morning and evening air.  There is a definite feel of Autumn; although the sun is still hot and the skies a vibrant blue, the nights now cool quickly after sunset.  This is a continuation of our journey of discovery as we only know the very hot and sunny Spain.  The cooler, wetter winter months are ahead… but before that the mango, avocado, olive and citrus harvests will happen.  We wait, eagerly, for this time of abundance and also for the opportunity to learn more about the olive harvest, the pressing for oil and the preserving of the olive fruit.

summer

The colours of summer – especially the blue Malaga sky!

 

Olives ripening in the late summer sun.

Olives ripening in the late summer sun.

Late September and warm sunny days are a pleasant change to the achingly bright and hot summer months.  The nights are fresher as Autumn approaches.  We’re looking forward to seeing the impact the rain has on the parched environment, and to the changing colours of the different seasons…

We have loved our 3 months in Spain so far.  The people are wonderful – vibrant, effervescent and unfailingly hospitable and helpful.  It’s been interesting seeing how they have warmed to us when we’ve tried our halting Spanish; and in turn they are willing to try their English out on us.

Still we look for a house to buy…  Somewhere to maximise the sunshine, give us a view of the gorgeous sierras and night skies, and possibly provide for an orchard or olive grove of our own…  We want to surround ourselves with as many photogenic locations as possible. Karyn wants to hear the tinkling of goat bells in the distance; Richard wants a tree laden with ripe avocados; we both want to see eagles soar overhead.  Not too much to ask for!  We’re keen to put down roots somewhere, and, with a place of our own, to shape our futures – in whatever form emerges…

The Andalusian Bull, overlooking Casabarmeja.

An Osborne Bull (now an emblem more than it is an advert for sherry), overlooking Casabarmeja.

 

Sunset after a hot summer's day.

Sunset over the hills.

As Autumn arrives and the Orange trees are laden with brightly coloured fruit, the Olive trees are hanging heavy-boughed with plump olives, the Quinces and Kaki fruit are so brightly coloured as to be fluorescent! The flavour of fruit plucked ripe off a tree is unsurpassed! We are revelling in it! So here is the golden quince….

Quinces for "dulce de membrillo" - in all their golden glory and with the most wonderful floral scent filling the kitchen!

Quinces for “dulce de membrillo” – in all their golden glory and with the most wonderful floral scent filling the kitchen!

As always, thank you for your friendship, visits, support, updates and feedback which have entertained us during our Spanish transition!

Best wishes

Richard and Karyn.

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The captivating Kalahari!

Talk about a journey of contrasts!  From the watery north, we ventured south to the Kalahari desert, to Kgalagadi National Park.  This park, which borders Namibia, was one of the first transfrontier parks in the world – it’s an amalgamation of the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park in South Africa, and the Gemsbok National Park in Botswana, and comprises over 3.6 million hectares!

The awesome red dunes of the Kalahari, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

The awesome red dunes of the Kalahari, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

The landscape was simply stunning!  Beautiful, sweeping red dunes, intersected by dry river beds: the Nossob, which only flows approximately once every hundred years, and the Auob, which flows approximately once every thirty to fifty years!  The only evidence of the course of these ‘rivers’ was a sliver of green grass in the river bed.  Visiting during the ‘wet season’, we were treated to the emergence of a range of desert flowers – tiny vibrant flowers which provided a visual treat for us and a welcome edible treat for the animals!  (One of the flowers in bloom, Devil’s Claw, is an ancient remedy which is now an internationally recognised supplement, to treat muscular, skeletal and joint conditions.)

The beautiful Devil's Claw flower, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

The beautiful Devil’s Claw flower, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

 

The iconic Gemsbok in the flowering dunes of the post-rain Kalahari Desert, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

The iconic Gemsbok in the flowering dunes of the post-rain Kalahari Desert, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

Advocates of Kgalagadi love the open vistas of the dunes and river beds, as when you do see animals, your views are unencumbered by the dense bush of other national parks.  And this is indeed true.  Game viewing is tough here, however…  You can spend a whole day in the car and be rewarded with no sightings of any note.  However, when the big cats are out, then they are mostly clearly visible – and a visual treat indeed!  (And the little cats are very cute too!)

Lithe, powerful and elegant: the Cheetah on the lookout for a meal. Kgalagadi NP, 2016

Lithe, powerful and elegant: the Cheetah on the lookout for a meal. Kgalagadi NP, 2016

 

Too cute but still very wary of the bigger cats. They hide away in the trees in the day. African Wild Cat, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

Too cute but still very wary of the bigger cats. They hide away in the trees in the day. African Wild Cat, Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

Luckily, our interest in birds and the little critters helped with the less productive days.  We saw heaps of tortoises – of all sizes; Sided-striped Mice and Whistling Rats; three stunning bright orange-yellow Cape Cobras, including one invading a Sociable Weavers’ nest; some gorgeous eagle owls; and dozens of elegant Kori Bustards and Northern Black Korhaans.

Whistling Rat pretending he is invisible! Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

Whistling Rat pretending he is invisible! Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

 

Gorgeous, but deadly Cape Cobra. If bitten, we would be dead before admission to the nearest hospital 250kms away! Fascinating. Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

Gorgeous, but deadly Cape Cobra. If bitten, we would be dead before admission to the nearest hospital 250kms away! Fascinating. Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

 

A melee of Springbok. Beautiful, fast and tasty to Cheetah! Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

A melee of Springbok. Beautiful, fast and tasty to Cheetah! Kgalagadi NP, 2016.

And finally, for a more tranquil end to our sojourn in the desert, we spent a wonderful three days camping at Kalahari Trails, just south of the park…  It was here that we experienced the peace, vast open spaces, solitude and beauty of the desert.  Professor Anne Rasa established Kalahari Trails as a sanctuary for Meerkats (or Suricates, of the Mongoose family) and to allow people to explore the desert on foot.  With the freedom to walk across the desert dunes and the vast openness of the night skies, it was indeed a magical way in which to end our desert experience.

Meerkat magic in the early morning sun! Kalahari Desert, 2016.

Meerkat magic in the early morning sun! Kalahari Desert, 2016.

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Namibia’s Watery North

From the dry heat of Etosha National Park we travelled to the north-east ‘strip’ of Namibia (previously known as the Caprivi Strip).  This section of the country juts into Botswana and Zambia, bordering those two countries as well as Zimbabwe.  It’s known as the ‘Four Rivers Route’: the Kavango (which becomes the Okavango in Botswana), Zambezi, Kwando and Chobe rivers all flow through here.

African sunset on the Okavango River in the Caprivi Strip, Namibia, 2016.

African sunset on the Okavango River in the Caprivi Strip, Namibia, 2016.

It was a treat to actually camp next to the Kavango River, and to have a fast-flowing watery world to experience after the absence of water for the previous few months.  We had sundowners each evening (as our throats were still dry from the dust of Etosha!) accompanied by the sounds of hippos cavorting.  The water is at the heart of the community – and changes (height, breadth and flow) with the seasons.  The local people seemed relatively more affluent too, with water to irrigate their crops; using mokoros to fish, for a free food source; and, a real treat, with access to running water for washing, drinking and swimming!  Yes, in spite of the prevalence of crocodiles in the Kavango River, young children delighted in swimming in the river, shrieking with pleasure as they splashed and played.  According to local beliefs, crocodiles are not interested in eating during the summer months when they breed, so it’s safe to swim in the river then!  This belief persists, in spite of evidence to the contrary when so-called ‘rogue crocodiles’ inevitably seize an unsuspecting swimmer each year…

The national parks in the Caprivi Strip are ‘mixed use’…  That means that the local people live on the outskirts of the parks, and are able to use the local resources such as wood, to sell firewood to tourists (beautiful, strong hardwood, which takes ages to burn, making wonderful coals for evening braais – or barbecues) or to craft wooden trinkets to sell (hand-carved souvenir mokoros or wild animals).  With revenue from tourism being directed back into the local communities, the idea is for local people to value the wildlife within the parks, rather than seeing the animals as just another food source.

These parks (Mahango and Buffalo national parks, within the Bwabwato National Park and conservation area) were relatively empty of visitors, so game viewing was a real treat, with undisturbed sightings.  We saw several highlights that were new to us, including Carmine Bee-eaters, Wattled Cranes and Red Lechwe, as well as previous favourites such as majestic Fish Eagles with their haunting cries which are so evocative of the African bush.  We spent hours trying to catch the bee-eaters in flight – with varying degrees of success!  It was fascinating seeing how the game adapted to the presence of water as the river flooded its banks.

Carmine Bee-eater landing after a hunting sortie, Mahango Game Reserve, Namibia, 2016.

Carmine Bee-eater landing after a hunting sortie, Mahango Game Reserve, Namibia, 2016.

 

Elegant and the largest but most endangered of all African Cranes: the Wattled Crane, Mahango, Namibia, 2016.

Elegant and the largest but most endangered of all African Cranes: the Wattled Crane, Mahango, Namibia, 2016.

 

An African icon:  the Fish Eagle, Mahango, Namibia, 2016.

An African icon: the Fish Eagle, Mahango, Namibia, 2016.

 

The real king of the beasts in Mahango, Namibia, 2016.

The real king of the beasts in Mahango, Namibia, 2016.

Buffalo national park had previously been home to 32nd Battalion – a South African Defence Force battalion that had been stationed in Namibia when it was still ‘South West Africa’.  Stories abound of how the soldiers shot plenty game, treating the area as a hunting playground…  Wandering through the ruined remains of their base was an eerie experience, not helped by the fact that we almost became completely mired in deep sand – causing us to face up to a few ghosts of our own as we wondered how long it would be before the next travellers drove past, to help rescue us!  Luckily our bakkie proved more resilient than we had given it credit for, and we managed to extract ourselves without having to call on or wait for help!

Leopard Tortoise at Buffalo Game Reserve, Caprivi, Namibia, 2016.

Leopard Tortoise at Buffalo Game Reserve, Caprivi, Namibia, 2016.

The watery green northeast corner of Namibia was a revelation – and a complete change to the landscape we’d experienced previously.  Apart from the ubiquitous and ever-annoying mosquitoes, we loved it!

Gloriosa superba!

Gloriosa superba!

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North to Namibia!

Elephant in Erindi

Elephant in Erindi

After 3 months in South Africa, it was time to head west, to Namibia, and then north, to Etosha… We set off with great excitement, eager to see the iconic landscapes about which we had heard so much. After 2 mega long days driving, crossing the border (as with many African countries) was typically underwhelming and bureaucratic, but, at last, we were through!

The Namibian landscape is very varied; however the south-eastern part of the country was our least favourite: it’s harsh and quite bleak, with furnace-like heat, miles and miles of white sand and stones, a mostly flat landscape and endlessly straight roads. With the intense heat we experienced the desert mirage: shimmering areas ahead that looked invitingly like water! We also understood the requirement to use your headlights at all times of day – cars with lights are definitely easier to distinguish from formless black shapes in the hazy distance. It’s an attempt to cut the very high death rate on the Namibian roads… Why, we’re unsure, as traffic is scarce indeed! Our guess is speed and boredom, as it’s easy to be less focused when the driving is so easy.

Wide open spaces in Namibia.

Wide open spaces in Namibia.

 

We had a brief stopover at Erindi, a private game reserve north of Windhoek, where we were fortunate to see some very cute bat-eared foxes; a first for both of us! We also experienced a deluge of rain, bringing large bullfrogs out of their holes and heralding (we hope), the end of the drought in Namibia. There was so much rain that roads were washed away; dam walls burst; and our previously sparkling blue swimming pool ended up looking like a muddy waterhole! At least our tent was thoroughly tested – and, we’re pleased to say, it survived. We, however, had several very scary moments on clay-like sections of the muddy roads and trying to traverse the pools of water that had collected across most roads. Rich called on his wet weather driving skills and Heath Robinson-like tactics to clear the deeper pools that blocked our path home on several occasions!

A highlight of our stay in Erindi was seeing elephants up close and watching the wonderfully entertaining antics of the hippos in the waterhole, which formed the central feature of the site. There was a hippo family resident there; it seemed as though the younger hippo was trying to assert himself, so we had much bellowing and open-jawed displays, as he took on his significantly larger mother! Hippos are very aggressive (including towards one another) and are known as one of Africa’s most dangerous animals; fortunately, though, these challenges seemed to be in jest.

Gorgeous little face of the Bat-eared Fox peaking out of the burrow.

Gorgeous little face of the Bat-eared Fox peaking out of the burrow.

 

The rains arrived in central Namibia and the bullfrogs emerged! Huge!

The rains arrived in central Namibia and the bullfrogs emerged! Huge!

 

Cavorting Hippos!

Cavorting Hippos!

And then for the highlight of Etosha… Our excitement mounted as we drove north to this well-renowned Namibian national park: we hypothesised about what we might see and experience; at the same time, keen not to have our expectations raised too high – to avoid any possible disappointment!

Our first camp was Okaukuejo: dry, stony and very busy, as it’s on the main travellers’ overland route through southern Africa. However, the waterhole at Okaukuejo is justifiably famous: it’s the only waterhole for miles, so is a favourite of the animals during the dry season and there is a wide variety of shaded benches from which you can watch the game come to drink and cool off. Floodlights enable night-time viewing too – with just rewards for those willing to stay up late!

The thirsty herd jostling for a drink.

The thirsty herd jostling for a drink.

 

Late at night the lions come down to drink. The males were roaring and the female was getting on with life - and a drink!

Late at night the lions come down to drink. The males were roaring and the female was getting on with life – and a drink!

We also encountered the persistent jackals and ground squirrels who roam the campsite, in search of titbits from visitors. They look very cute, and it’s wonderful to see wild animals up close; the downside is that the naivety of travellers who feed the animals can lead to them being shot as they can become aggressive if they lose their fear of humans. We were vigilant about not leaving food out… However, the jackals ‘won’ one night, as they chewed through the strap of Karyn’s trusty walking sandals!

The game viewing in this middle section of the park is hard work, because of the scarcity of water and food across the vast, seemingly endless plains and the huge dry pan. If patient, though, and willing to drive slowly in order to spot the well-camouflaged birds, reptiles and mammals, there are rewards to be had. It’s just that the days in the car are long, and the rewards are few and far between! The exception is the melee at the waterholes, as animals desperate for water crowd the available space.

An Etosha melee at the waterhole!

An Etosha melee at the waterhole!

Viewing a pride of somnolent lions, resting in the limited midday shade, was a real treat! The cubs were restless and playful; watching their interactions with the adults – especially the regal male – gave us several hours of pleasure. The other viewing that sustained our spirits was the range of birds, especially predators. We had some superb sightings of several birds that were new to us, alongside previously seen favourites.

Ooooh Lions! Always a treat - and some lovely cub action!

Ooooh Lions! Always a treat – and some lovely cub action!

 

One of the most striking birds here - the Crimson Breasted Shrike - posing nicely.

One of the most striking birds here – the Crimson Breasted Shrike – posing nicely.

 

The Greater Kestrel - struggling to find a tree in this vast place - a single tree becomes a hive of activity.

The Greater Kestrel – struggling to find a tree in this vast place – a single tree becomes a hive of activity.

From Okaukuejo we drove west, through Halali Camp, to Namutomi. Halali was a little oasis for a lunchtime stop: we saw our first owl in the park near the waterhole, an ever-so-cute Pearl-spotted owlet which was very tolerant of us photographing him, and a gorgeous chameleon whose exploring got the better of him! He fell off his tree as he tried to move to another branch, turning white as he landed on the white sand below, and then changing back to green as he sought refuge in the next tree.

East of Halali we also passed a flock of flamingos (both greater flamingos and lesser) amassed in a waterhole near the road where they were feeding. Simply stunning!

One of the bushes real beauties - the beermug sized Pearl-spotted Owlet!

One of the bush’s real beauties – the beermug sized Pearl-spotted Owlet!

 

One of the "Slow 5"!

One of the “Slow 5”!

 

Awesome beauty in an arid land!

Awesome beauty in an arid land!

Namutoni Camp was delightful! It was far greener than the other camps (there was actually grass in the campsite, rather than stones and rocks!) and there were several waterholes within a 15 kilometre radius of the camp, which meant that game was far more prolific and our game drives were consequently significantly more rewarding. It was frustrating to drive towards a feature marked as a waterhole on the map, only to find it dried up… However, once we got to know the area, we quickly developed favourite spots where sightings were more-or-less guaranteed.

One of our favourite spots was the Okevi (Groot – or big – and Klein – or small) waterholes. It was here that we first saw a black rhino pair attempting to mate. Well, the male was, but for most of the time the female was having none of it! (Some interesting reflections here for the males of our species… sex seems so much easier for men than the poor rhino male!) This male was clearly highly frustrated: he could smell the female was in oestrus, and she seemed to be keen for him to approach – only to then bellow aggressively and charge towards him, to fend him off. He then beat a hasty retreat to the shade of a nearby tree, before trying again…

An angry female Black Rhino - with a headache chasing off an amorous male!

An angry female Black Rhino – with a headache chasing off an amorous male!

It was also in this area that we saw our first glimpse of a cheetah family: a mother and her two teenage cubs (probably about a year old). They were moving off from the waterhole, into the thick bush, as we approached. We then spent a frustrating couple of hours of our own, trying to second-guess where they were headed! When we finally saw them later they had clearly chosen the path we hadn’t taken, and by then they were mere ‘blobs’ in the middle of the pan as a dust storm obliterated our view.

Two days later our patience was rewarded: we saw the same cheetah family feasting on a recent kill. It was completely absorbing watching them devour an entire springbuck (apart from the innards) while the vultures maintained a respectful distance, waiting for their turn to feed. The interactions between the two cubs and between the mother and her cubs were very tender, as they carefully groomed one another after their feeding frenzy!

The quickest of the lot - the Cheetah family, having a clean-up after devouring a Springbok.

The quickest of the lot – the Cheetah family, having a clean-up after devouring a Springbok.

Another favourite was the Klein Namutomi waterhole. It was here that we regularly saw animals come to drink – and we were also very lucky to see three young male lions resting nearby, and, a real treat, a leopard up a tree!

Wow! One of the greatest prizes in the African bush - a big male Leopard!

Wow! One of the greatest prizes in the African bush – a big male Leopard!

So, for us, Namutomi delivered. We loved our time there and would certainly return again… We are keen to go back after the rainy season, to explore a very different landscape when the pans have water in them. More about that if (or hopefully when) we manage to return!

It’s been an interesting learning experience for both of us spending 24 hours a day together 7 days a week as we’ve both re-learned tolerance and the importance of down-time, good food and some luxuries in-between the long days in the car… The campsite swimming pools have been a god-send; our fan has enabled us to sleep at night (an electric fan, to create wind – not a keen supporter following us!); and our potjie pot has given us much pleasure as we create some magical slow-cooked meals over the coals.

We now head to the Caprivi Strip, from where our next update will hopefully follow, and then further north into Zambia as our adventure continues… We thank you all for your support, as your messages and interest sustain and nurture us, and wish you well as you go about your daily lives and follow your dreams.

Karyn and Richard

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Awesome Andalucia!

Even further south, through Valenciana, lies Andalucia. Occupying most of Southern Spain, encompassing the deserts of Almeria in the east;  the Sierra Nevada and other fascinating, smaller sierra ranges; sun drenched Costas on the Mediterranean; and Donana National Park in the west near the border with Portugal, Andalucia could take you your lifetime to explore!

We are trying it a little more quickly than that, but are being enthralled nonetheless. The Sierra Nevada has a smattering of small villages beneath the peaks, snow on the peaks for much of the year and boasts the highest paved road in Europe…as opposed to the Alps which might have been an obvious choice…

Bubion, one of the pristine little white villages perched high up on the slopes of the Sierra Nevada.

Bubion, one of the pristine little white villages perched high up on the slopes of the Sierra Nevada.

The highest paved road in Europe over the Sierra Nevada.

The highest paved road in Europe over the Sierra Nevada.

Descending the twists and turns and heading west, through miles and miles and hills and hills of olive and almond groves, you will find Ronda. Home to where the bullfight originated, but possibly more famous for being built on either side of a precipitous gorge. The Puente Nuevo gets you over the chasm safely and walking down the well trodden path to the slopes beneath offers up some lovely views….and a stiff climb back to the town above!

 

The Puente Nuevo (new bridge), Ronda, Andalucia, Spain.

The Puente Nuevo (new bridge), Ronda, Andalucia, Spain.

North of Malaga lies the fascinating and ancient town of Antequerra, and in true human fashion we easily forget how many millenia the planet Earth was in existence before we laid an evolutionary eye on it. Just outside of Antequera stands El Torcal: Europe’s fines karst formation. A truly ancient (100 Million years!) old seabed, now rasied 1000 metres into the sky and slowly eroding (very slowly, given the low rainfall!)  to yield stunning rock formations for climbers and photographers alike…and of course the Spanish Ibex…

Antequera: one of Spain's most ancient towns.

Antequera: one of Spain’s most ancient towns.

 

El Torcal. Europes finest karts formation and certainly a fascinating place to explore.

El Torcal: Europe’s finest karst formation and certainly a fascinating place to explore.

 

Spanish Ibex - taken to life on the rocks and cliffs and as comfortable as a duck on a pond.

Spanish Ibex – taken to life on the rocks and cliffs and as comfortable as a duck on a pond.

 

Leaving the rocky outcrops of El Torcal and heading to the western extremes of Spain and Andalucia sees Seville slide up over the horizon. The ancient powerhouse of Europe and the 4th largest city in the world at one stage in the 1600s, Seville is a beautiful place. Colourful, culturally rich, chaotic at times, baking hot in summer and photogenic – well worth a visit with all you camera gear… but beware of pickpockets!

And a big plus, apart from all the fresh orange juice, is Donana National Park down the road. So much more to see…

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South, to Spain & Sun!

Summer in Northern Europe is a very different experience to that in the South – in time and intensity.  Driving through France is a relaxed and pleasant affair (the shenanigans at Calais excluded).  The French countryside down to the Loire Valley is green and undulating, with fields of cheerful sunflowers and row upon row of vineyards.  The villages are quaint and somnolent in the heat of summer…  Crossing the Pyrenees into Spain, the sun gets hotter, the land more arid and the proximity of Africa is evident: Vultures circle, Yellow-billed kites soar and the vast plains of sun bleached grass are reminiscent of the highveldt.  So too are the wide, blue skies…

The harsh and rocky environment of Sax, Valenciana, Spain.

The harsh and rocky environment of Sax, Valenciana, Spain.

The history of Spain is long and complex. As we travel and learn about the present, the past exerts an influence and reminds us how much of what we see is built on that which came before…

The Castle in Sax, Valenciana, Spain.

The Castle in Sax, Valenciana, Spain.

Hunting is widespread in Spain and outside protected areas not much survives. What wildlife we do see also reminds us that we we do today will affect our future and that of our sons and daughters…

Scarce Swallowtail in Biar, Valenciana, Spain.

Scarce Swallowtail in Biar, Valenciana, Spain.

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